networking 101

job hunting

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what's in this lesson?

Let’s face it: you’re gonna need to know how to network if you want to snag that dream job. The fact of the matter is, you’re much more likely to get the role if you know someone who can help you get an interview. We’re here to help you figure out the best ways to make your network work for your job search.

networking 101

job hunting

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  • Overview
  • Transcript
  • Resources

networking 101

job hunting

Let’s face it: you’re gonna need to know how to network if you want to snag that dream job. The fact of the matter is, you’re much more likely to get the role if you know someone who can help you get an interview. We’re here to help you figure out the best ways to make your network work for your job search.

Your network is probably the most valuable resource you have in finding a job — U.S news estimates that over 70% of jobs are found through networking. Pretty crazy, right?

 

But even if you don’t have a super robust network just yet, don’t worry. We’re going to break down some of the best ways to use your current network (yes, you do have one) and how to get started growing your network in this networking 101 lesson.

 

First things first, what IS a network? In a professional sense, it’s typically used to describe the interconnectedness of people you know or have interacted with.

 

One of the most valuable things you can get from your network is: LEARNING!

 

You can learn a lot about the type of job you’re searching for, how to stand out when applying for roles, and even what to expect along the career path if you’re able to connect with veterans in the industry you’re looking at.

 

You’ll want to try to make connections with people in the type of role you’re interested in or who works at one of the companies you’d like to work at.

 

Simple conversations with a few people can give you a real advantage in the job hunting process. Plus, you may even be able to get a referral which is one of the best ways to stand out.

 

Soooo this is all great but, where do you start?!

 

  • Linkedin is a great place to identify and make connections.
  • Try to get some warm intros get introduced to someone via someone you already know.
    • Ex: if you want to work at onomy, and Dave from your high school is connected to Jennifer who works at onomy, you can ask Dave if he would be comfortable connecting you with Jennifer.
  • The best way to message is through Linkedin or email. 
  • Keep your outreach message concise.
  • Offer to buy the person a coffee or drink as a thank you for chatting with you.
  • Don’t be afraid to follow up if you don’t hear back right away!

 

Once you actually reach out to a few people, the next step is to meet them! 

 

Whether you’re meeting for coffee or hanging out on Zoom for a few minutes, here’s what you should do before the big networking meet-up:

 

  • Do your research ahead of time so you can connect on any similarities.
  • Come with questions & enthusiasm.
  • Be clear about your intentions.
  • Send thank you notes & follow-ups! Your gratitude will not go unnoticed.

what's in this lesson?

Let’s face it: you’re gonna need to know how to network if you want to snag that dream job. The fact of the matter is, you’re much more likely to get the role if you know someone who can help you get an interview. We’re here to help you figure out the best ways to make your network work for your job search.

Transcript

Your network is probably the most valuable resource you have in finding a job — U.S news estimates that over 70% of jobs are found through networking. Pretty crazy, right?

 

But even if you don’t have a super robust network just yet, don’t worry. We’re going to break down some of the best ways to use your current network (yes, you do have one) and how to get started growing your network in this networking 101 lesson.

 

First things first, what IS a network? In a professional sense, it’s typically used to describe the interconnectedness of people you know or have interacted with.

 

One of the most valuable things you can get from your network is: LEARNING!

 

You can learn a lot about the type of job you’re searching for, how to stand out when applying for roles, and even what to expect along the career path if you’re able to connect with veterans in the industry you’re looking at.

 

You’ll want to try to make connections with people in the type of role you’re interested in or who works at one of the companies you’d like to work at.

 

Simple conversations with a few people can give you a real advantage in the job hunting process. Plus, you may even be able to get a referral which is one of the best ways to stand out.

 

Soooo this is all great but, where do you start?!

 

  • Linkedin is a great place to identify and make connections.
  • Try to get some warm intros get introduced to someone via someone you already know.
    • Ex: if you want to work at onomy, and Dave from your high school is connected to Jennifer who works at onomy, you can ask Dave if he would be comfortable connecting you with Jennifer.
  • The best way to message is through Linkedin or email. 
  • Keep your outreach message concise.
  • Offer to buy the person a coffee or drink as a thank you for chatting with you.
  • Don’t be afraid to follow up if you don’t hear back right away!

 

Once you actually reach out to a few people, the next step is to meet them! 

 

Whether you’re meeting for coffee or hanging out on Zoom for a few minutes, here’s what you should do before the big networking meet-up:

 

  • Do your research ahead of time so you can connect on any similarities.
  • Come with questions & enthusiasm.
  • Be clear about your intentions.
  • Send thank you notes & follow-ups! Your gratitude will not go unnoticed.

Additional Resources

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