how to find & apply for jobs (quickly!!!)

job hunting

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

what's in this lesson?

The job search process is pretty much a job in itself. It can be VERY time consuming. That being said, there are a handful of ways you can shorten and optimize the process for yourself — per usual, that’s where we come in!

how to find & apply for jobs (quickly!!!)

job hunting

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
  • Overview
  • Transcript
  • Resources

how to find & apply for jobs (quickly!!!)

job hunting

The job search process is pretty much a job in itself. It can be VERY time consuming. That being said, there are a handful of ways you can shorten and optimize the process for yourself — per usual, that’s where we come in!

Ways to search for open roles

 

There are four main ways you can conduct your search – you can search by company, you can search by position, you can turn to your network, or you can use a recruiter. 

 

Searching by company. A great place to start is by creating a list of some of your top choices. Then, you’ll want to confirm a few things prior to submitting an application:

 

    • Location – Make sure they’re in the location you’re focused on or in a location you’re willing to move to. While a lot of companies are more open to remote work than they used to be, many won’t hire outside their regional area (even if you say you’re going to move). 
    • Company research – Check out reviews, salary numbers, etc. to see if the company’s internal culture aligns with what you’re looking for. Glassdoor is a great resource for this.
    • What jobs are available? – Go to their websites and head to the careers/jobs page (typically in the navigation or in the footer). If they don’t have anything open that you’re looking for, you can often sign up for email alerts to be notified of job openings as they become available.

 

Search by role. The best place to start is to determine what roles you’re targeting – create a list of keywords that match what you’re looking for, positions are often called different things at different companies. For example, Marketing manager could also be marketing lead, product marketing manager, or brand manager. You’ll want to conduct searches for all of these if you’re interested in all of them!

 

Then, you can search for open roles in job search engines or aggregation sites like these:

 

    • LinkedIn – is a great one because you can often immediately see what connections you have at companies as part of the search process. 
    • Indeed – this one is a bit of a catch-all, meaning it’ll potentially have every single job opening in the world on it. Well, not the world, but there are a ton. Could be helpful, but also could be overwhelming.
    • Builtin – In some large cities, BuiltIn is a great resource. They’re also do tons of company news articles, have great ratings of companies, and also aggregate job openings. It’s not all encompassing, but can def be helpful for what they do have!
    • The rest – There are tons of others, like Ziprecruiter, Glassdoor, etc. that do much of the same as some of these others. 

 

Search within your network. This can also be a great resource to track down open roles. Sometimes, employees at companies will know about open roles before they become publicly available. Similarly, lots of open roles are shared on LinkedIn as companies grow their team. Be sure not to slack on scrolling through LinkedIn on a given day, you never know what you’ll find! There’s a lot more to networking in general – don’t forget to check out our Networking 101 lesson to dive deeper.

 

Search by recruiter. This can be an option to help you in your job search. One thing to note is that recruiters are paid by companies, not job seekers. They tend to be best for individuals who work in a very high demand field (i.e. UX design, engineering) and can often be beneficial when you’re a ways into your career. At the entry level/early career stage, they’ll typically not be open to working with you. But, when you do get to a point where you’re working with them, recruiters can be huge advocates for you!

 

Tips for applying

 

Alright, we talked about how to find roles, now let’s get to the meaty stuff. The age old question: How do I stand out in my job search? They’ve been asking that since the stone age. Let’s look at a few ways to help you come out on top. 

 

  • Resume – it all starts with the resume. This is the first point of entry for every job. To stand out, cater it to the role as much as you can – find keywords in the job description that are unique and align with your background that you can add to your resume that you’re submitting. It’s best not to just fire off the same resume to a bunch of employers. If you have irrelevant information on there, it could hurt your cause more than help it. Want more resume tips? Check out our lesson called, you guessed it, “Resume tips!”

 

  • Cover letter – While not every position requires a cover letter, many do. The cover letter is an opportunity to elaborate on parts of your resume that align directly with the role and demonstrate your excitement. Similarly to a resume, you want to target it to each role. You can definitely mix and match from existing or previous cover letters, but make sure to customize it with wording and language specific to the role. Align it with the job description as much as possible and show you’ve done your research (can you mention company pillars, beliefs, etc.?). 

 

  • Outreach emails – Once you apply, it can often be beneficial to reach out to the hiring manager or HR rep.This can be a great way to stand out and it takes only a couple extra minutes. Send a short message demonstrating your excitement and attach your resume/cover letter (same one in the application). Make it personal, concise, and to the point.

 

  • Networking – Networking is probably the most ideal way to stand out in the application process, and it can often help you get a position. Many times, it’s better to reach out to someone at the company before you apply – great opportunity to get some extra umph behind your application. At many companies, they actually have a different application system for applicants who are referred (and pay out referral bonuses to team members who refer new hires). Work the network. 

 

Yeah, so you can see how looking for a job can be a full-time job on its own. But, if you go about it with a strategy and use some of the key approaches we discussed here, you’ll be allllll good.

 

what's in this lesson?

The job search process is pretty much a job in itself. It can be VERY time consuming. That being said, there are a handful of ways you can shorten and optimize the process for yourself — per usual, that’s where we come in!

Transcript

Ways to search for open roles

 

There are four main ways you can conduct your search – you can search by company, you can search by position, you can turn to your network, or you can use a recruiter. 

 

Searching by company. A great place to start is by creating a list of some of your top choices. Then, you’ll want to confirm a few things prior to submitting an application:

 

    • Location – Make sure they’re in the location you’re focused on or in a location you’re willing to move to. While a lot of companies are more open to remote work than they used to be, many won’t hire outside their regional area (even if you say you’re going to move). 
    • Company research – Check out reviews, salary numbers, etc. to see if the company’s internal culture aligns with what you’re looking for. Glassdoor is a great resource for this.
    • What jobs are available? – Go to their websites and head to the careers/jobs page (typically in the navigation or in the footer). If they don’t have anything open that you’re looking for, you can often sign up for email alerts to be notified of job openings as they become available.

 

Search by role. The best place to start is to determine what roles you’re targeting – create a list of keywords that match what you’re looking for, positions are often called different things at different companies. For example, Marketing manager could also be marketing lead, product marketing manager, or brand manager. You’ll want to conduct searches for all of these if you’re interested in all of them!

 

Then, you can search for open roles in job search engines or aggregation sites like these:

 

    • LinkedIn – is a great one because you can often immediately see what connections you have at companies as part of the search process. 
    • Indeed – this one is a bit of a catch-all, meaning it’ll potentially have every single job opening in the world on it. Well, not the world, but there are a ton. Could be helpful, but also could be overwhelming.
    • Builtin – In some large cities, BuiltIn is a great resource. They’re also do tons of company news articles, have great ratings of companies, and also aggregate job openings. It’s not all encompassing, but can def be helpful for what they do have!
    • The rest – There are tons of others, like Ziprecruiter, Glassdoor, etc. that do much of the same as some of these others. 

 

Search within your network. This can also be a great resource to track down open roles. Sometimes, employees at companies will know about open roles before they become publicly available. Similarly, lots of open roles are shared on LinkedIn as companies grow their team. Be sure not to slack on scrolling through LinkedIn on a given day, you never know what you’ll find! There’s a lot more to networking in general – don’t forget to check out our Networking 101 lesson to dive deeper.

 

Search by recruiter. This can be an option to help you in your job search. One thing to note is that recruiters are paid by companies, not job seekers. They tend to be best for individuals who work in a very high demand field (i.e. UX design, engineering) and can often be beneficial when you’re a ways into your career. At the entry level/early career stage, they’ll typically not be open to working with you. But, when you do get to a point where you’re working with them, recruiters can be huge advocates for you!

 

Tips for applying

 

Alright, we talked about how to find roles, now let’s get to the meaty stuff. The age old question: How do I stand out in my job search? They’ve been asking that since the stone age. Let’s look at a few ways to help you come out on top. 

 

  • Resume – it all starts with the resume. This is the first point of entry for every job. To stand out, cater it to the role as much as you can – find keywords in the job description that are unique and align with your background that you can add to your resume that you’re submitting. It’s best not to just fire off the same resume to a bunch of employers. If you have irrelevant information on there, it could hurt your cause more than help it. Want more resume tips? Check out our lesson called, you guessed it, “Resume tips!”

 

  • Cover letter – While not every position requires a cover letter, many do. The cover letter is an opportunity to elaborate on parts of your resume that align directly with the role and demonstrate your excitement. Similarly to a resume, you want to target it to each role. You can definitely mix and match from existing or previous cover letters, but make sure to customize it with wording and language specific to the role. Align it with the job description as much as possible and show you’ve done your research (can you mention company pillars, beliefs, etc.?). 

 

  • Outreach emails – Once you apply, it can often be beneficial to reach out to the hiring manager or HR rep.This can be a great way to stand out and it takes only a couple extra minutes. Send a short message demonstrating your excitement and attach your resume/cover letter (same one in the application). Make it personal, concise, and to the point.

 

  • Networking – Networking is probably the most ideal way to stand out in the application process, and it can often help you get a position. Many times, it’s better to reach out to someone at the company before you apply – great opportunity to get some extra umph behind your application. At many companies, they actually have a different application system for applicants who are referred (and pay out referral bonuses to team members who refer new hires). Work the network. 

 

Yeah, so you can see how looking for a job can be a full-time job on its own. But, if you go about it with a strategy and use some of the key approaches we discussed here, you’ll be allllll good.

 

Additional Resources

How's it going?

1 = not helpful at all; 5 = extremely helpful

Sign up for course updates!

* indicates required
What topic(s) are you interested in?

By subscribing, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. You can unsubscribe at any time by contacting onomy or using the unsubscribe link.

lessons