finding a new apartment

renting an apartment

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what's in this lesson?

Time to kick-off the actual search part of your apartment search! Well, finding a new apartment can be a lot of work. There are an overwhelming number of websites and apps to help you find a new apartment… Soooo where should you start? In this lesson, we’ll cover some of the best places to find an apartment, what to consider when touring apartments, and conversations you should be having during your search.

finding a new apartment

renting an apartment

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  • Overview
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  • Resources

finding a new apartment

renting an apartment

Time to kick-off the actual search part of your apartment search! Well, finding a new apartment can be a lot of work. There are an overwhelming number of websites and apps to help you find a new apartment… Soooo where should you start? In this lesson, we’ll cover some of the best places to find an apartment, what to consider when touring apartments, and conversations you should be having during your search.

Unfortunately, finding a new apartment is a lot more difficult than simply looking online, applying for the apartment and then YAY you’re in!

 

Yeah… no. That quick process would be nice, though. Let us know if you’re lucky enough to have your search go that smoothly.

 

So, let’s break down what ACTUALLY happens and you can best move through the process.

 

Where to look for an apartment

 

Option 1:

 

The easiest place to look? You guessed it — the internet! We’ve linked some of the most popular websites & apps to help you find your perfect place in the additional resources section below.

 

If you’re still not finding exactly what you’re looking for after a few Google searches or while browsing through some of the sites we’ve listed, you do have some other options. 

 

Option 2:

 

Since you’re probably already spending a ton of time on social media, it can make sense to look for apartments there. You may notice friends, or friends of friends, or even friends of friends of friends posting about looking to fill an apartment. Pro tip: if you’re looking for roommates, you can join apartment search Facebook groups for certain cities to help you find a spot and/or some roomies!

 

Option 3:

 

You can also do a little “manual search” and drive around the neighborhoods you’re interested in living in. Look for all the “For RENT” signs around the neighborhood and give the number on the sign a call to book a tour. This strategy works especially well because you can get a feel for the neighborhood before you even tour the actual apartment.

 

Option 4:

 

Another option is searching for an apartment with a broker. Here’s the thing though — this option will likely cost ya (usually about a month’s worth of rent or more… yikes). Since a broker essentially searches for apartments for you, you’ll probably have to pay some sort of fee once they find you a place. This option can be good if you simply *don’t have the time* to be searchin’ on your own.

 

Touring apartments

 

You’re going to want to see the place you’ll be living in before you sign the papers to move in for (usually) at least a year. Because trust us, pictures don’t always tell the whole story of an apartment…

 

Make sure you visit the places you’re interested in to get a good idea of the overall vibe, the natural light, the appliances available, any additional apartment building facilities, etc.

 

Touring an apartment is also a great opportunity to get a feel for your future neighbors and the overall neighborhood. 

 

Conversations with landlords & other tenants 

 

You’ll definitely want to do your best to get the answers to your questions before you put pen to paper.

 

You’re paying a ton of money to live somewhere for the next 12-ish months… So ask away! Here are some ideas of things you might want to ask your landlord before signing the papers:

 

  • What might I be charged for at the end of my lease?
  • Can I paint the walls? If I do, do I need topaint them back?
  • What are the noise levels like around here?
  • Am I allowed to hang things on the walls?
  • Are pets allowed?

 

You may also want to ask some of the neighbors a few questions if you can too (or look at reviews online to get some answers):

 

  • What’s the landlord like?
  • Are there any loud neighbors around?
  • Do you feel safe in this building and neighborhood?
  • How long have you lived here/ do you like it?

 

After you’ve done your searching, toured some places and asked all the necessary questions, you’ve got all the prep work done… It’s time to sign!

 

what's in this lesson?

Time to kick-off the actual search part of your apartment search! Well, finding a new apartment can be a lot of work. There are an overwhelming number of websites and apps to help you find a new apartment… Soooo where should you start? In this lesson, we’ll cover some of the best places to find an apartment, what to consider when touring apartments, and conversations you should be having during your search.

Transcript

Unfortunately, finding a new apartment is a lot more difficult than simply looking online, applying for the apartment and then YAY you’re in!

 

Yeah… no. That quick process would be nice, though. Let us know if you’re lucky enough to have your search go that smoothly.

 

So, let’s break down what ACTUALLY happens and you can best move through the process.

 

Where to look for an apartment

 

Option 1:

 

The easiest place to look? You guessed it — the internet! We’ve linked some of the most popular websites & apps to help you find your perfect place in the additional resources section below.

 

If you’re still not finding exactly what you’re looking for after a few Google searches or while browsing through some of the sites we’ve listed, you do have some other options. 

 

Option 2:

 

Since you’re probably already spending a ton of time on social media, it can make sense to look for apartments there. You may notice friends, or friends of friends, or even friends of friends of friends posting about looking to fill an apartment. Pro tip: if you’re looking for roommates, you can join apartment search Facebook groups for certain cities to help you find a spot and/or some roomies!

 

Option 3:

 

You can also do a little “manual search” and drive around the neighborhoods you’re interested in living in. Look for all the “For RENT” signs around the neighborhood and give the number on the sign a call to book a tour. This strategy works especially well because you can get a feel for the neighborhood before you even tour the actual apartment.

 

Option 4:

 

Another option is searching for an apartment with a broker. Here’s the thing though — this option will likely cost ya (usually about a month’s worth of rent or more… yikes). Since a broker essentially searches for apartments for you, you’ll probably have to pay some sort of fee once they find you a place. This option can be good if you simply *don’t have the time* to be searchin’ on your own.

 

Touring apartments

 

You’re going to want to see the place you’ll be living in before you sign the papers to move in for (usually) at least a year. Because trust us, pictures don’t always tell the whole story of an apartment…

 

Make sure you visit the places you’re interested in to get a good idea of the overall vibe, the natural light, the appliances available, any additional apartment building facilities, etc.

 

Touring an apartment is also a great opportunity to get a feel for your future neighbors and the overall neighborhood. 

 

Conversations with landlords & other tenants 

 

You’ll definitely want to do your best to get the answers to your questions before you put pen to paper.

 

You’re paying a ton of money to live somewhere for the next 12-ish months… So ask away! Here are some ideas of things you might want to ask your landlord before signing the papers:

 

  • What might I be charged for at the end of my lease?
  • Can I paint the walls? If I do, do I need topaint them back?
  • What are the noise levels like around here?
  • Am I allowed to hang things on the walls?
  • Are pets allowed?

 

You may also want to ask some of the neighbors a few questions if you can too (or look at reviews online to get some answers):

 

  • What’s the landlord like?
  • Are there any loud neighbors around?
  • Do you feel safe in this building and neighborhood?
  • How long have you lived here/ do you like it?

 

After you’ve done your searching, toured some places and asked all the necessary questions, you’ve got all the prep work done… It’s time to sign!

 

Additional Resources

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