where do you sign up

navigating health insurance

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where do you sign up

navigating health insurance

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where do you sign up

navigating health insurance

So, how exactly do you get health insurance? There are a few different places, actually. Let’s talk through some options.

overview

Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance

At most full-time salaried positions, your employer will offer you health insurance options that are largely funded by the company as part of your benefits package. You’ll have options to choose from based on your needs (sometimes from a few health insurance companies). These options are, in the grand scheme of things, lower cost to you because your employer is generally covering a significant percentage of the cost (and sometimes all of it… wuuuuuut?). And they get better rates than you would individually by offering insurance to a larger pool of people–this is called “group coverage.” Money spent on your plan is also pre-tax, which lowers your taxable income (less taxes for you!). So when you first start at a new job, make sure you look out for information about your health care options and all the associated rates.

 

The Insurance Exchanges

If you aren’t at a job that offers health insurance, your best bet is to look at one of the exchanges. Nearly every state has an exchange as part of the Affordable Care Act, where you can shop for insurance a la carte. The exchange presents health insurance options to you and allows you to shop for the plan that best fits your needs. See our link in the resources to healthcare.gov, where you can see the options available to you.

 

Other Ways to Get Health Insurance

It’s important to note that you are allowed to stay on your parents’ health care until the age of 26–so keep this in mind as you’re looking for options. If you’re married, you can pay to join your spouse’s insurance as well. Are you still in college? Many colleges and universities offer health insurance coverage that can be tacked onto your tuition bill.

 

In the next lesson, we’ll dive into all those fancy health insurance terms you’ve heard tossed around. Surprisingly, they’re more than just a bunch of three-letter acronyms. Stay tuned!

 

Source(s): healthcare.gov, eHealth

How's it going?

resources

overview

Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance

At most full-time salaried positions, your employer will offer you health insurance options that are largely funded by the company as part of your benefits package. You’ll have options to choose from based on your needs (sometimes from a few health insurance companies). These options are, in the grand scheme of things, lower cost to you because your employer is generally covering a significant percentage of the cost (and sometimes all of it… wuuuuuut?). And they get better rates than you would individually by offering insurance to a larger pool of people–this is called “group coverage.” Money spent on your plan is also pre-tax, which lowers your taxable income (less taxes for you!). So when you first start at a new job, make sure you look out for information about your health care options and all the associated rates.

 

The Insurance Exchanges

If you aren’t at a job that offers health insurance, your best bet is to look at one of the exchanges. Nearly every state has an exchange as part of the Affordable Care Act, where you can shop for insurance a la carte. The exchange presents health insurance options to you and allows you to shop for the plan that best fits your needs. See our link in the resources to healthcare.gov, where you can see the options available to you.

 

Other Ways to Get Health Insurance

It’s important to note that you are allowed to stay on your parents’ health care until the age of 26–so keep this in mind as you’re looking for options. If you’re married, you can pay to join your spouse’s insurance as well. Are you still in college? Many colleges and universities offer health insurance coverage that can be tacked onto your tuition bill.

 

In the next lesson, we’ll dive into all those fancy health insurance terms you’ve heard tossed around. Surprisingly, they’re more than just a bunch of three-letter acronyms. Stay tuned!

 

Source(s): healthcare.gov, eHealth

Lessons in this course:

resources

onomy-resources

lessons

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