interview tips: what you need to know

job hunting

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The job interview. Possibly the most anxiety inducing part of the whole job hunting process. Interviews can def be stressful, but they don’t have to be! They can actually be quite the opposite once you start to feel prepared, confident, and excited about the whole process.  Let’s cover some of the basic, yet critical, things to consider when interviewing in this lesson.

interview tips: what you need to know

job hunting

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interview tips: what you need to know

job hunting

The job interview. Possibly the most anxiety inducing part of the whole job hunting process. Interviews can def be stressful, but they don’t have to be! They can actually be quite the opposite once you start to feel prepared, confident, and excited about the whole process.  Let’s cover some of the basic, yet critical, things to consider when interviewing in this lesson.

When it comes to interviewing, you always want to be prepared, be positive and enthusiastic, and prove you’re the best candidate for the job. Don’t forget: you’re also interviewing them. You want to make sure this company is a fit for what you’re looking for in your career – it’s a two-way street! Here are some interview tips that’ll help you nail it:

 

Ways to prepare for an interview

 

  • Over-preare! We’re not talking trying to endlessly cram an hour before your interview. Give yourself as much lead time as possible to get ready, and do your best to attack preparation from all angles.
  • Do as much research on the company as possible. Have they been in the news recently? What’s their culture like? Knowing critical company information can help you both demonstrate your knowledge when answering interview questions and help you come up with good questions of your own. PRO TIP: To get a feel for what to expect, networking with someone at the company can give you insight into this, as well.
  • Know your audience. Who are you interviewing with? Is it just an HR rep? Is it the hiring manager or person you’d be reporting to on the job? Understand the different types of questions you might be asked and how each might approach the interview. Learn as much about the interviewer as possible, “where they went to school, where they worked previously, how long they worked at the company you’re currently interviewing for”. The more you know, the better, this is about finding common ground. Relatability is huge when it comes to making a good first impression. Remember this: people hire people they like. And commonalities are the building blocks for likeability.
  • Nail your elevator pitch.  So, tell me a little about yourself. I’m sure you’ve gotten this question or a variation of it before. Answering it can be a grueling, yet it’s a critical question you need to answer. Come up with a 60-90 second elevator pitch on yourself that you can cover quickly so you don’t drone on and lose the attention of the interviewer.
  • Anticipate questions that will be asked. Do as much research as you can on common questions asked for the position you applied for. Study the job description to anticipate what questions might be asked, or check out resources to see what questions might have been asked in similar interviews in the past – Glassdoor is great for this. Check out our lesson on interview questions for more deets on how to approach them.

 

How to present yourself in an interview

 

  • Be likeable! Remember that in an interview, interviewers are not just assessing your skills and the words you say back to them in answering questions, they also want to make sure you’re someone they’d enjoy working with. They might even want to know if you’re a buddy they can talk sports with or would enjoy grabbing lunch with.
  • Maintain confidence and enthusiasm. A great way to maintain confidence is by utilizing strong eye contact, and smiling when you’re talking. Use “confident body languages” to invoke that you not only have lots of experience in this line of work, but that you’re eager to perform at the highest level possible. Relay your excitement for the opportunity at all chances you get.

 

A couple last key tips for your interview:

 

  • Get a feel for the dress code and always dress a level above. When in doubt, lean toward something more conservative. Lastly, when interviewing in person, print and bring extra copies of your resume!
  • Present yourself as the best version of you! Allow your unique qualities and strengths to shine as you provide vivid examples of how much value those qualities can bring to the table. Businesses are about making money, illustrate how your strengths will help make that company more money with you than it would without you.

 

The night before a job interview

 

This differs depending on if you’re interviewing in person or virtually/over the phone, but prep is important and can create peace of mind. 

 

  • If in person, check out the commute and plan timing accordingly. Arrive in the office 15 minutes before your scheduled start time. You’ll also want to print out copies of your resume the night before to avoid any last minute issues.
  • If your interview is virtual, check the tool for the online meeting to make sure you are familiar with it, that you have the right software, know how it works with your internet, etc. And, if your interview is a phone call, make sure you’ll be somewhere with good service

 

PRO TIP: Lay out your clothes the night before, it’s one less thing to think about to free up brain space for the important stuff. And, get a good night’s sleep!

 

The day of a job interview

 

  • Power your brain with some healthy food and mentally prepare in whatever way is best for you and be confident and excited.
  • If your interview is virtual, be a little early as well. 5 minutes is enough, and you’ll want to maintain eye contact as much as you can. Don’t ever signal that you’re doing something else on the computer while they’re talking or looking at your phone. If you’re taking notes, you can be open about that from the outset so that the interviewer doesn’t think you’re distracted.
  • Always relay your thanks and appreciation at the end of the interview (and, ideally, they should be doing the same for you).
  • Send thank you notes within 24 hours of the interview. Everyone appreciates a thank you note, and you’d be surprised at how many people don’t send them. They’re a great way to stand out and reiterate your excitement for the opportunity.

 

You want this job? Go and get it. Hey, we know you can do it.

what's in this lesson?

The job interview. Possibly the most anxiety inducing part of the whole job hunting process. Interviews can def be stressful, but they don’t have to be! They can actually be quite the opposite once you start to feel prepared, confident, and excited about the whole process.  Let’s cover some of the basic, yet critical, things to consider when interviewing in this lesson.

Transcript

When it comes to interviewing, you always want to be prepared, be positive and enthusiastic, and prove you’re the best candidate for the job. Don’t forget: you’re also interviewing them. You want to make sure this company is a fit for what you’re looking for in your career – it’s a two-way street! Here are some interview tips that’ll help you nail it:

 

Ways to prepare for an interview

 

  • Over-preare! We’re not talking trying to endlessly cram an hour before your interview. Give yourself as much lead time as possible to get ready, and do your best to attack preparation from all angles.
  • Do as much research on the company as possible. Have they been in the news recently? What’s their culture like? Knowing critical company information can help you both demonstrate your knowledge when answering interview questions and help you come up with good questions of your own. PRO TIP: To get a feel for what to expect, networking with someone at the company can give you insight into this, as well.
  • Know your audience. Who are you interviewing with? Is it just an HR rep? Is it the hiring manager or person you’d be reporting to on the job? Understand the different types of questions you might be asked and how each might approach the interview. Learn as much about the interviewer as possible, “where they went to school, where they worked previously, how long they worked at the company you’re currently interviewing for”. The more you know, the better, this is about finding common ground. Relatability is huge when it comes to making a good first impression. Remember this: people hire people they like. And commonalities are the building blocks for likeability.
  • Nail your elevator pitch.  So, tell me a little about yourself. I’m sure you’ve gotten this question or a variation of it before. Answering it can be a grueling, yet it’s a critical question you need to answer. Come up with a 60-90 second elevator pitch on yourself that you can cover quickly so you don’t drone on and lose the attention of the interviewer.
  • Anticipate questions that will be asked. Do as much research as you can on common questions asked for the position you applied for. Study the job description to anticipate what questions might be asked, or check out resources to see what questions might have been asked in similar interviews in the past – Glassdoor is great for this. Check out our lesson on interview questions for more deets on how to approach them.

 

How to present yourself in an interview

 

  • Be likeable! Remember that in an interview, interviewers are not just assessing your skills and the words you say back to them in answering questions, they also want to make sure you’re someone they’d enjoy working with. They might even want to know if you’re a buddy they can talk sports with or would enjoy grabbing lunch with.
  • Maintain confidence and enthusiasm. A great way to maintain confidence is by utilizing strong eye contact, and smiling when you’re talking. Use “confident body languages” to invoke that you not only have lots of experience in this line of work, but that you’re eager to perform at the highest level possible. Relay your excitement for the opportunity at all chances you get.

 

A couple last key tips for your interview:

 

  • Get a feel for the dress code and always dress a level above. When in doubt, lean toward something more conservative. Lastly, when interviewing in person, print and bring extra copies of your resume!
  • Present yourself as the best version of you! Allow your unique qualities and strengths to shine as you provide vivid examples of how much value those qualities can bring to the table. Businesses are about making money, illustrate how your strengths will help make that company more money with you than it would without you.

 

The night before a job interview

 

This differs depending on if you’re interviewing in person or virtually/over the phone, but prep is important and can create peace of mind. 

 

  • If in person, check out the commute and plan timing accordingly. Arrive in the office 15 minutes before your scheduled start time. You’ll also want to print out copies of your resume the night before to avoid any last minute issues.
  • If your interview is virtual, check the tool for the online meeting to make sure you are familiar with it, that you have the right software, know how it works with your internet, etc. And, if your interview is a phone call, make sure you’ll be somewhere with good service

 

PRO TIP: Lay out your clothes the night before, it’s one less thing to think about to free up brain space for the important stuff. And, get a good night’s sleep!

 

The day of a job interview

 

  • Power your brain with some healthy food and mentally prepare in whatever way is best for you and be confident and excited.
  • If your interview is virtual, be a little early as well. 5 minutes is enough, and you’ll want to maintain eye contact as much as you can. Don’t ever signal that you’re doing something else on the computer while they’re talking or looking at your phone. If you’re taking notes, you can be open about that from the outset so that the interviewer doesn’t think you’re distracted.
  • Always relay your thanks and appreciation at the end of the interview (and, ideally, they should be doing the same for you).
  • Send thank you notes within 24 hours of the interview. Everyone appreciates a thank you note, and you’d be surprised at how many people don’t send them. They’re a great way to stand out and reiterate your excitement for the opportunity.

 

You want this job? Go and get it. Hey, we know you can do it.

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