answering & asking interview questions

job hunting

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what's in this lesson?

Job interviews typically require a lot of answering and asking of questions, so you’ll want to be good at both. You know the part where interviewers turn it over to you to ask them questions? That’s actually one of the most critical, most underrated parts of an interview! Luckily we’ve got some tips that can help you get in the right mindset when it comes to interview questions. Let’s get it!

answering & asking interview questions

job hunting

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  • Overview
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answering & asking interview questions

job hunting

Job interviews typically require a lot of answering and asking of questions, so you’ll want to be good at both. You know the part where interviewers turn it over to you to ask them questions? That’s actually one of the most critical, most underrated parts of an interview! Luckily we’ve got some tips that can help you get in the right mindset when it comes to interview questions. Let’s get it!

Types of questions to expect during a job interview

 

Generally, there are a few main types of questions, but we’ll cover three of the big ones: 

 

  • Behavioral questions: these are more about you or your background or specific to scenarios you’ve been in before (example: How would you describe your working style? Tell me about a time you disagreed with a supervisor and how you dealt with it.)
  • Situational questions: these can vary and are often hypothetical. The goal of these is for the interviewer to get a feel for how you handle certain situations or think through problems. (example: we need to build an Instagram profile from scratch and get to 1k followers in the first month. How would you start tackling this problem?)
  • Technical questions: typically, these are more common for product/engineering focused roles. (Example: you might be asked how to go about solving technical problems, how to explain complex technical concepts to non-engineers, and other similar questions.)

 

Generally, it’s helpful to figure out the key points that you know you want to weave into your answers. You can often answer the questions being asked and simultaneously add more value for yourself and the interviewer by taking your answer a step further. 

 

Answering interview questions

 

A good approach to use for answering interview questions is the STAR format. Note that this format won’t apply to every question asked, but for ones it does it can be valuable.

 

STAR is an acronym that stands for Situation, Task, Action, and Result.

 

Here’s an example: The interviewer asks you a question of: What’s something you’ve accomplished in your career that you’re most proud of? You’ll want to break down your answer with the STAR format, just like this example below: 

 

Situation: So, about a year into my first job working in business development at my last advertising agency, I was given the responsibility of leading a pitch for a potential new client. 

 

Task: It was my responsibility to build a team and lead the full development of a strategy and pitch that would show the client that our agency was the right partner to lead their marketing efforts. 

 

Action: I brought together team members from the creative, finance, account, and video production teams to build the strategy. It was a super fast and extremely collaborative project – one of the best learning experiences of my career. When the day came, I led the entire pitch myself. 

 

Result: We won the business! It was my first win and I was really proud of all of us. It was definitely a big confidence booster for me. That client is still working with the agency to this day. 

 

Pretty cool, huh? You can see how that clear breakdown can help you lay out scenarios you’ve been in and create a narrative that the interviewer can easily follow. Again, this format won’t apply to every question you’re asked, but for the ones that do, it can do wonders.

 

When it comes to answering questions, you’ll also want to practice. Working with a friend or family member to get in practice can seriously boost your interviewing ability. For many, interviewing can be nerve wracking and anxiety-inducing. Do as much as you can to get comfortable ahead of time.

 

Asking interview questions

 

Interviewers love to be asked good, thoughtful questions. Come up with enough questions to fill as much time as possible at the end, and if you’re interviewing with multiple people, come up with enough questions to ask all of them without overlapping (and anticipate that many of them may be answered during the interview by the interviewer). 

 

You’ll want to ask questions that:

  • Help you understand every aspect of the job which you’re being presented
  • Help you get a keen understanding of the work environment, potential co-workers, and any and all downside potential.

DO YOUR RESEARCH! Your research will lead to a slew of questions you’ll have regarding your employment there, so make sure all of your questions are answered to a T before leaving your meeting!

 

A proper line of questioning will reassure the interviewer that should they not choose you, they’ll be missing out on an all-star candidate WHO BRINGS VALUE every step of the way. This isn’t just important to ace the interview–asking questions can also help determine if the company/role is right for YOU. 

 

A well thought out approach and strategy to interview questions and answers can be a big booster for you. Make sure to put in the time, and you’ll end up at a company that’s right for you before you know it.

 

what's in this lesson?

Job interviews typically require a lot of answering and asking of questions, so you’ll want to be good at both. You know the part where interviewers turn it over to you to ask them questions? That’s actually one of the most critical, most underrated parts of an interview! Luckily we’ve got some tips that can help you get in the right mindset when it comes to interview questions. Let’s get it!

Transcript

Types of questions to expect during a job interview

 

Generally, there are a few main types of questions, but we’ll cover three of the big ones: 

 

  • Behavioral questions: these are more about you or your background or specific to scenarios you’ve been in before (example: How would you describe your working style? Tell me about a time you disagreed with a supervisor and how you dealt with it.)
  • Situational questions: these can vary and are often hypothetical. The goal of these is for the interviewer to get a feel for how you handle certain situations or think through problems. (example: we need to build an Instagram profile from scratch and get to 1k followers in the first month. How would you start tackling this problem?)
  • Technical questions: typically, these are more common for product/engineering focused roles. (Example: you might be asked how to go about solving technical problems, how to explain complex technical concepts to non-engineers, and other similar questions.)

 

Generally, it’s helpful to figure out the key points that you know you want to weave into your answers. You can often answer the questions being asked and simultaneously add more value for yourself and the interviewer by taking your answer a step further. 

 

Answering interview questions

 

A good approach to use for answering interview questions is the STAR format. Note that this format won’t apply to every question asked, but for ones it does it can be valuable.

 

STAR is an acronym that stands for Situation, Task, Action, and Result.

 

Here’s an example: The interviewer asks you a question of: What’s something you’ve accomplished in your career that you’re most proud of? You’ll want to break down your answer with the STAR format, just like this example below: 

 

Situation: So, about a year into my first job working in business development at my last advertising agency, I was given the responsibility of leading a pitch for a potential new client. 

 

Task: It was my responsibility to build a team and lead the full development of a strategy and pitch that would show the client that our agency was the right partner to lead their marketing efforts. 

 

Action: I brought together team members from the creative, finance, account, and video production teams to build the strategy. It was a super fast and extremely collaborative project – one of the best learning experiences of my career. When the day came, I led the entire pitch myself. 

 

Result: We won the business! It was my first win and I was really proud of all of us. It was definitely a big confidence booster for me. That client is still working with the agency to this day. 

 

Pretty cool, huh? You can see how that clear breakdown can help you lay out scenarios you’ve been in and create a narrative that the interviewer can easily follow. Again, this format won’t apply to every question you’re asked, but for the ones that do, it can do wonders.

 

When it comes to answering questions, you’ll also want to practice. Working with a friend or family member to get in practice can seriously boost your interviewing ability. For many, interviewing can be nerve wracking and anxiety-inducing. Do as much as you can to get comfortable ahead of time.

 

Asking interview questions

 

Interviewers love to be asked good, thoughtful questions. Come up with enough questions to fill as much time as possible at the end, and if you’re interviewing with multiple people, come up with enough questions to ask all of them without overlapping (and anticipate that many of them may be answered during the interview by the interviewer). 

 

You’ll want to ask questions that:

  • Help you understand every aspect of the job which you’re being presented
  • Help you get a keen understanding of the work environment, potential co-workers, and any and all downside potential.

DO YOUR RESEARCH! Your research will lead to a slew of questions you’ll have regarding your employment there, so make sure all of your questions are answered to a T before leaving your meeting!

 

A proper line of questioning will reassure the interviewer that should they not choose you, they’ll be missing out on an all-star candidate WHO BRINGS VALUE every step of the way. This isn’t just important to ace the interview–asking questions can also help determine if the company/role is right for YOU. 

 

A well thought out approach and strategy to interview questions and answers can be a big booster for you. Make sure to put in the time, and you’ll end up at a company that’s right for you before you know it.

 

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